Archive for the ‘New York Post’ Category

Why One Single Brooklyn Woman Lowered Her Expectations

Sunday, November 10th, 2013

By Jocelyn Voo
New York Post

In September, a report by online dating site Are You Interested crowned Brooklyn women the pickiest online daters in the nation. As a fervent advocate of Internet dating and someone who just celebrated her 10-year New Yorkiversary, I found this entirely believable. This is, after all, a city of people who demand their coffee cold-pressed and their yoga studios WTF-hot.

The filters on dating sites give us license to be equally persnickety, sorting suitors by everything ranging from age to astrological sign. With a few clicks, you’ve got a bunch of algorithmically determined Prince Charmings waiting for you.

Or so it would seem. After years of off-and-on activity, none of my 70 percent-plus mathematical matches has proven to be an everlasting real-life match. Maybe, if this study holds true, I really should stop keyword-searching for world travelers and roboticists (hey, we all have our quirks).

And so I decided to embark on a week of being completely unpicky, seeking out OKCupid guys who ranked as close to 0 percent match/100 percent opposite as possible. I mean, this could possibly net me my soulmate — right? (more…)

Sweat Equity

Monday, January 16th, 2012

Sweat equity

By Jocelyn Voo
New York Post

If you’ve ever wondered what a $22,000 sports bra looks like, imagine a silk racerback number embellished with diamond-eyed gold skulls and an 18-karat solid gold zipper.

If you’ve ever wondered what kind of person would make such a product during a recession, meet Kelly Dooley, triathlete, fashion aficionado and founder of the activewear brand BodyRock Sport.

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Door Prize: Ice Cream Biz Hits Folks Where They Live

Monday, August 23rd, 2010

By Jocelyn Voo
New York Post

When assessing your monthly expenses, it’s not auspicious if one of the big line items is your ice-cream budget. For Diana Hardeman, though, a persistent pint habit pointed toward opportunity.

A 2009 grad of NYU’s Stern School of Business, Hardeman was living in Alphabet City and contemplating her next move when the idea of selling ice cream struck.

“A lot of my peers came out [of school] with jobs, and I didn’t know exactly what it was I wanted,” says the 27-year-old. “And then I bought an ice-cream maker.”

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Can-do Spirit

Monday, March 29th, 2010


By Jocelyn Voo
New York Post

Some people call the bathroom their “second office,” but in the workplace, New Yorkers seem to do everything besides their business once they enter the porcelain palace.

Judging by the goings-on, the office bathroom is more akin to one’s private living room than a public library. Colleagues yap on their cellphones, brush their teeth, even take naps in there. Why? Similar to how you might have claimed a certain stapler or a specific corner of the break room fridge as “yours,” you’ve also subconsciously claimed the bathroom, too.

“In environmental psych terms, the office bathroom is perceived as a ‘secondary territory’ — regular users see it as theirs even though it’s public,” explains Steve Schiavo, professor of psychology at Wellesley College. “No visitor would do those behaviors there.”

A cursory search of OverheardInNewYork.com reveals the scope of intimate conversations going on in office bathrooms: a Park Avenue Plaza trader making deals via cellphone while on the toilet, two NoHo women discussing the possibility that one of them may be dating a pee fetishist.

Mark, 21, recalls hitting the bathroom at his Long Island workplace only to hear a co-worker having a heated cellphone conversation — in Russian, no less — while locked in a stall.

“I sat outside in the break room for about 15 minutes, hearing him babble on and on,” he says.

Flagrant phone calls aren’t the only transgression. Others treat the office bathroom as if it were their personal grooming quarters. Like Tanveer, a 27-year-old programming manager who used to bring his electric razor to work to shave in the morning.

“Sometimes I brushed and flossed my teeth, too,” he adds, “but I think a lot of people do that.”

And that’s not even to mention the technological goings-on. In an AOL poll, 61 percent of New York e-mail users said they’ve checked their e-mail from the bathroom.

“It’s the only place I use the video capabilities of my iPhone,” says Joe, a 30-something tech worker.

Most frequently watched? “Seasons 1 through 6 of ‘Aqua Teen Hunger Force.’ It’s the only location where this entertainment seems appropriate,” he explains.

(more…)

Liar, Liar: Truth Be Told, We All Tell Some Whoppers on the Job

Monday, November 24th, 2008


By Jocelyn Voo
New York Post | Nov. 24, 2008

So maybe you aren’t entirely proficient at Microsoft Excel, despite what you wrote on your resume. And sure, maybe the product you’re hawking isn’t as amazing as you’re making it out to be, but everyone knows understatement doesn’t pay the bills. And you’ll be taking a few days off work because your grandmother died . . . again . . . for the fourth time?

Lying in the workplace is nothing unusual. According to a 2006 survey by CareerBuilder.com, 19 percent of workers admitted to stretching the truth at least once a week (and many of the others were likely stretching the truth when they reported otherwise), so you’re not alone when you claim your BlackBerry must’ve malfunctioned, or that you missed work because of food poisoning. In fact, some experts would argue that while you may be being dishonest, you’re also just being smart.

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Seat Mates: Grad-School Pals Build Pants Biz One Leg At a Time

Monday, August 11th, 2008

By Jocelyn Voo
New York Post

Asking a guy if you can feel his pants isn’t a standard interview line. Then again, having him jut out his canary-yellow seersucker-clad butt and enthusiastically suggest, "You might want to grab the right cheek," isn’t a standard response, either.

Brian Spaly, 31, and Andy Dunn, 29, are those kinds of guys – playful, personable and kickback. Still, behind their California-guy demeanor and longish, untamed hair lie a pair of enterprising businessmen with a full-fledged fixation: pants.

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Exit Strategies: A.M. Routines Run the Gamut from Calming to Chaotic

Monday, June 9th, 2008

By Jocelyn Voo
New York Post

In a town where "fashionably late" is the norm, there’s one instance where time is of the essence: getting to work in the morning.

But it’s no easy matter. Factor in housemates or spouses fighting for the bathroom, jam-packed trains, endless lines at Starbucks and the occasional losing battle with a hangover and/or snooze button, and you’re pretty much guaranteed a no-show at your 9 a.m. meeting.

Anticipating such obstacles, many locals have their morning routines down to a science. They run the gamut from those who make it from bed to door faster than most people down their first cup of joe to those whose a.m. ritual is practically a separate shift.

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Drudgery Report: Tedium is Enemy No. 1 at Work

Monday, February 18th, 2008


By Jocelyn Voo
New York Post

On the seventh hour of his 8½-hour shift at a Midtown office building, Laz, 41, looks weary as he stands with his hands clasped in front of him.

“The standing is the worst part,” says the security guard of three years.

Invisibly tethered to his post, he paces back and forth a few feet from his original spot to keep the blood moving in his legs. Listening to music is forbidden. Dispensing directions to lost guests is the extent of his socializing.

The good part, Laz says, is meeting the celebrities and athletes that come through, though “meet” is defined loosely, considering he never gets to converse with them, just nod and open the guarded glass gates with a smile.

But compared to his old job, this gig’s a dream.

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Dream Job Q&A: Celebrity Wrangler Lori Levine

Monday, January 14th, 2008

By Jocelyn Voo
New York Post

Growing up in the Technicolor ’80s with Madonna as a surrogate mother, Lori Levine almost had no choice but to go into celebrity wrangling – doing everything from getting Clooney’s face on this event’s red carpet to getting J.Lo’s booty into that brand’s jeans.

At 16, she was already trekking in from Long Island to work parties in the city with a promoter friend.

“He had the hottest party on Long Island, whatever that means,” Levine laughs.

Nowadays, as founder and CEO of the talent booking and brokering agency Flying Television, Levine puts together parties a far cry from those of her B&T years. Current projects include Entertainment Weekly’s opening weekend fest at Sundance, and she recently took over the entire Louis Vuitton store on Fifth Avenue to throw Kanye West’s 30th birthday bash.

But for Levine, a former “Late Night With Conan O’Brien” booker, it’s not always about the glitz. Yes, she has Jessica Simpson on speed-dial, is a sucker for a pair of heels (the walk-in closet at her Gramercy duplex holds more than 100 pairs), and cavorts around town with her Shih Tzu, Suki, in a handbag. But she’s also committed to working charity events, and says Bill Clinton is the only celeb who’s left her star-struck.

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Effort to Spare: For Harlem Woman, Alley Brings It All Back Home

Monday, November 12th, 2007

By Jocelyn Voo
New York Post

SHARON Joseph may have moved from Wall Street to 126th Street, but the investment analyst turned bowling-alley owner is still clocking 80-hour weeks and occasionally leaving at 4 in the morning.

“I don’t know what normal life’s like. All I talk about is bowling," she says.

Around the corner from the Apollo Theater is Joseph’s new enterprise: Harlem Lanes, a 25,000-square-foot bowling alley almost hidden from the street. The lanes occupy the third and fourth floors of the Alhambra Ballroom building on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard, and if not for the narrow red sign jutting out from the side of the building and a nondescript arrow pointing toward the entrance, one might easily miss it.

It’s not far from where Joseph got her first taste of entrepreneurship: Harlem’s PS 113, where as a youth she got involved with Junior Achievement of New York (JANY), a nonprofit that teaches K-12 students financial literacy and business skills. Kids growing up in Harlem generally mimic the occupations they see, Joseph says – funeral director, bodega owner, beautician.

“I never saw somebody who worked on Wall Street. I didn’t even know where it was," she remembers. “Junior Achievement planted a seed."

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